Custom Search
Top Stories       Entertainment       Music       Lifestyle       Sports       Home
Science            Internet           Technology           World          US Regional
Business           Finance            Companies            Industry            Society
Science news
Women in science: Smashing glass ceilings and glass walls - BBC News
Women in science: Smashing glass ceilings and glass walls  BBC News

From pushing boundaries to defying stereotypes - five women who are breaking barriers in science.


Science Means Not Knowing - Scientific American
Science Means Not Knowing  Scientific American

What's the hardest and also the greatest part about being a scientist? Realizing that there is so much we don't know. As humans, we crave answers. When faced ...


How Poetry Can Help Communicate Science - Scientific American
How Poetry Can Help Communicate Science  Scientific American

At first glance, poetry might seem to have very little to offer science, other than a few choice compliments or cursory remarks. However, it can be an extremely ...


Guy Consolmagno, the Vatican’s chief astronomer, on science and religion - Vox.com
Guy Consolmagno, the Vatican’s chief astronomer, on science and religion  Vox.com

He also digs into Galileo, icy moons, and the relationship between science and religion.


This jellyfish makes glowing proteins previously unknown to science - Science Magazine
This jellyfish makes glowing proteins previously unknown to science  Science Magazine

In 2017, Nathan Shaner and his colleagues found something unusual in the blue-green waters off Heron Island. As the group of scientists snorkeled the reefs ...


Ask A Spaceman: The Science of Apollo | Video Show - Space.com
Ask A Spaceman: The Science of Apollo | Video Show  Space.com

Astrophysicist Paul Sutter breaks down the science behind NASA's historic Apollo moon missions for Space.com. Tune in here!


Debate intensifies over speed of expanding universe - Science Magazine
Debate intensifies over speed of expanding universe  Science Magazine

This week, leading experts at clocking one of the most contested numbers in the cosmos—the Hubble constant, the rate at which the universe ...


Reconfigurable ferromagnetic liquid droplets - Science Magazine
Reconfigurable ferromagnetic liquid droplets  Science Magazine

Ferromagnetic materials show a permanent magnetic dipole, whereas superparamagnetic ones only show magnetic properties under an applied field.


Science Fiction Sent Man to the Moon - The New York Times
Science Fiction Sent Man to the Moon  The New York Times

Neil Armstrong's first small step owed more than you'd think to the footsteps of Jules Verne, H.G. Wells and Fritz Lang.


Dicamba Drift Is Threatening Soybean Science : The Salt - NPR
Dicamba Drift Is Threatening Soybean Science : The Salt  NPR

Scientists at four leading universities have seen their soybean experiments injured by a stealthy vandal: drifting fumes from a weedkiller called dicamba, now ...


Permanent liquid magnets have now been created in the lab - Science News
Permanent liquid magnets have now been created in the lab  Science News

Magnets that generate persistent magnetic fields are usually solid. But new little bar magnets have the mechanical properties of liquids.


How HoloLens is helping advance the science of spaceflight - Engadget
How HoloLens is helping advance the science of spaceflight  Engadget

AR headsets haven't exactly caught on with the general public -- especially after the Google Glass debacle. Mixed reality technology has garnered a sizable ...


Apollo 11 Moon Landing Showed That Aliens Might Be More Than Science Fiction - Live Science
Apollo 11 Moon Landing Showed That Aliens Might Be More Than Science Fiction  Live Science

The moon may be dead, but the Apollo 11 astronauts still managed to bring extraterrestrial life back to Earth. Astronomer/alien hunter Seth Shostak explains.


Why Are These Mice Hallucinating? Scientists Are in Their Heads - The New York Times
Why Are These Mice Hallucinating? Scientists Are in Their Heads  The New York Times

New laser technology appeared to trigger particular images in the brains of lab mice.


Science Central celebrates moon landing | Local | Journal Gazette - Fort Wayne Journal Gazette
Science Central celebrates moon landing | Local | Journal Gazette  Fort Wayne Journal Gazette

Just a few small steps inside Science Central, patrons were treated Saturday to a celebration of one of mankind's most giant leaps – the Apollo 11 moon landing.


Science and Innovation - Conservation International
Science and Innovation  Conservation International

We believe that science is fundamental. Our scientists are developing tools that help value the critical links between nature and human well-being.


Scrutiny of Chinese American scientists raises fears of ethnic profiling - The Washington Post
Scrutiny of Chinese American scientists raises fears of ethnic profiling  The Washington Post

Federal officials urge universities to counter threat from China of academic espionage.


Stabilizing the West Antarctic Ice Sheet by surface mass deposition - Science Advances
Stabilizing the West Antarctic Ice Sheet by surface mass deposition  Science Advances

There is evidence that a self-sustaining ice discharge from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) has started, potentially leading to its disintegration.


China's present and future lunar exploration program - Science Magazine
China's present and future lunar exploration program  Science Magazine

Since the beginning of the 21st century, the pace of lunar exploration has accelerated, with more than a dozen probes having undertaken scientific exploration of ...


Mystery surrounds ouster of Chinese researchers from Canadian laboratory - Science Magazine
Mystery surrounds ouster of Chinese researchers from Canadian laboratory  Science Magazine

Canadian researchers are reacting with puzzlement to the news that a “policy breach” has caused the nation's only high-containment disease laboratory to bar a ...


Amyloid β oligomers constrict human capillaries in Alzheimer's disease via signaling to pericytes - Science Magazine
Amyloid β oligomers constrict human capillaries in Alzheimer's disease via signaling to pericytes  Science Magazine

Like a computer, the brain needs a reliable source of power, which is provided as oxygen and glucose in the blood. However, in many neurological disorders ...


What can scientists learn from stand-up comedy? - Science Magazine
What can scientists learn from stand-up comedy?  Science Magazine

Our Experimental Error columnist shares lessons for giving effective presentations inspired by performing comedy.


Science on a Sphere lets guests explore space - CBS7 News
Science on a Sphere lets guests explore space  CBS7 News

The Blakemore Planetarium at the Museum of the Southwest unveiled an exhibit that gives guests a new look at the solar system and more.


Lunar Mysteries That Science Still Needs to Solve - WIRED
Lunar Mysteries That Science Still Needs to Solve  WIRED

What scientists most want to know about our closest planetary neighbor.


Most Wikipedia Profiles Are of Men. This Scientist Is Changing That. - The New York Times
Most Wikipedia Profiles Are of Men. This Scientist Is Changing That.  The New York Times

Jessica Wade has added nearly 700 Wikipedia biographies for important female and minority scientists in less than two years.


World Health Organization declares Ebola outbreak an international emergency - Science Magazine
World Health Organization declares Ebola outbreak an international emergency  Science Magazine

The World Health Organization (WHO) today declared that the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), which surfaced in August 2018, ...


New Jurassic mammaliaform sheds light on early evolution of mammal-like hyoid bones - Science Magazine
New Jurassic mammaliaform sheds light on early evolution of mammal-like hyoid bones  Science Magazine

One trait that is unique to mammals is milk suckling. Suckling requires the presence of stability and motion in the throat, both of which require a complex hyoid ...


Scientists searching for alien life aren’t very popular in science - Quartz
Scientists searching for alien life aren’t very popular in science  Quartz

Scientists looking for evidence of extraterrestrials can draw media attention but also cynical, even hostile, reactions from their colleagues.


The universe's expansion rate is still a mystery - Science News
The universe's expansion rate is still a mystery  Science News

A mismatch in measurements of how fast the universe is expanding might not be real, a study hints.


Accolades, skepticism and science marked Science News' coverage of Apollo - Science News
Accolades, skepticism and science marked Science News' coverage of Apollo  Science News

Science News' coverage of the Apollo program stayed focused on the science but also framed the moon missions in the broader social and political context of ...


Scientists Desert USDA As Agency Relocates To Kansas City Area - NPR
Scientists Desert USDA As Agency Relocates To Kansas City Area  NPR

Two vital research agencies at the U.S. Department of Agriculture are hemorrhaging staff as less than two-thirds of the researchers asked to relocate from ...


IRE1α–XBP1 signaling in leukocytes controls prostaglandin biosynthesis and pain - Science Magazine
IRE1α–XBP1 signaling in leukocytes controls prostaglandin biosynthesis and pain  Science Magazine

A “sUPR” target for pain management? The unfolded protein response (UPR) is initiated when unfolded or misfolded proteins accumulate in the endoplasmic ...


Whose Utopia? How Science Used The Bodies Of People Deemed 'Less Than' - NPR
Whose Utopia? How Science Used The Bodies Of People Deemed 'Less Than'  NPR

There is a long legacy of leaders exploiting the bodies of vulnerable people in the name of science. This week, the history of eugenics and medical ...


Chloride capture using a C–H hydrogen-bonding cage - Science Magazine
Chloride capture using a C–H hydrogen-bonding cage  Science Magazine

Part of the reason salt dissolves so well in water is that the polarized O–H bonds attract the negatively charged chloride ions. It has therefore been common to ...


This gene may help worms live longer, but not healthier - Science News
This gene may help worms live longer, but not healthier  Science News

Antiaging therapies may have trade-offs, research on worms suggests.


Gorillas have developed humanlike social structure, controversial study suggests - Science Magazine
Gorillas have developed humanlike social structure, controversial study suggests  Science Magazine

A bold claim about gorilla societies is drawing mixed reviews. Great apes, humans' closest evolutionary relatives, were thought to lack our social complexity.


If this type of dark matter existed, people would be dying of unexplained 'gunshot' wounds - Science Magazine
If this type of dark matter existed, people would be dying of unexplained 'gunshot' wounds  Science Magazine

Dark matter, the mysterious substance that makes up most of the mass of the universe, has proved notoriously hard to detect. But scientists have now proposed a ...


A deadly fungus gives 'zombie' ants a case of lockjaw - Science News
A deadly fungus gives 'zombie' ants a case of lockjaw  Science News

Fungus-infected “zombie” ants are known to scale a plant, sink their jaws into a leaf or twig and wait to die while the Ophiocordyceps unilateralis fungi feast on ...


Girls' reading ability drives the science gender gap, claims study - physicsworld.com
Girls' reading ability drives the science gender gap, claims study  physicsworld.com

The gender gap in maths-related fields could be determined by girls' superior reading skills, which leads them to favour humanities-based professions. That is ...


A Look At The Science Of The Thirty Meter Telescope - Honolulu Civil Beat
A Look At The Science Of The Thirty Meter Telescope  Honolulu Civil Beat

(AP) — Is there life on planets outside our solar system? How did stars and galaxies form in the earliest years of the universe? How do black holes shape ...


Arctic science at risk as University of Alaska braces for draconian budget cuts - Science Magazine
Arctic science at risk as University of Alaska braces for draconian budget cuts  Science Magazine

University of Alaska (UA) administrators are scrambling to decide how to impose deep mandatory spending cuts that could hobble research programs at one of ...


Nutrition Science Is Broken. This New Egg Study Shows Why. - Undark Magazine
Nutrition Science Is Broken. This New Egg Study Shows Why.  Undark Magazine

Opinion | At turns lauded and vilified, the humble egg is an example of everything wrong with nutrition studies.


What Seinfeld can teach us about science - The Guardian
What Seinfeld can teach us about science  The Guardian

From micro pigs to the doping dangers of a poppy seed bagel, life may be imitating the US sitcom.


Elon Musk's startup eyes human testing for brain-computer interface - Science Magazine
Elon Musk's startup eyes human testing for brain-computer interface  Science Magazine

Elon Musk's high-profile foray into connecting brains to computers, a 2-year-old company called Neuralink, detailed its ambitions and unveiled some initial ...


Earth's Core Has Been Leaking for 2.5 Billion Years and Geologists Don't Know Why - Live Science
Earth's Core Has Been Leaking for 2.5 Billion Years and Geologists Don't Know Why  Live Science

Earth's scorching core is not a loner — it has been caught mingling with other, underworldly layers. That's according to a new study that found the innermost part ...


Silencing Science (Rebroadcast) - Reveal
Silencing Science (Rebroadcast)  Reveal

President Donald Trump says he doubts humans have much of a role in climate change. His administration has not only downplayed the science of climate ...


Ancient people may have used pig fat to build Stonehenge - Science Magazine
Ancient people may have used pig fat to build Stonehenge  Science Magazine

The 30-ton megaliths that make up Stonehenge in Wiltshire, U.K., might have been moved using more than just elbow grease. Pig fat residue on nearby pottery ...


Jeffrey Epstein liked palling around with scientists — what do they think now? - The Verge
Jeffrey Epstein liked palling around with scientists — what do they think now?  The Verge

Jeffrey Epstein's presence has loomed large over the scientific community for several decades. To some of the most high-profile scientists around the world, ...


A neuro-inspired artificial peripheral nervous system for scalable electronic skins - Science
A neuro-inspired artificial peripheral nervous system for scalable electronic skins  Science

The human sense of touch is essential for dexterous tool usage, spatial awareness, and social communication. Equipping intelligent human-like androids and ...


Scientists work out way to make Mars surface fit for farming - The Guardian
Scientists work out way to make Mars surface fit for farming  The Guardian

Aerogel sheet mimics Earth's greenhouse effect and could help to create fertile oases.


Lyme disease: is a solution on the way? - The Guardian
Lyme disease: is a solution on the way?  The Guardian

The tick-borne illness, which is on the rise, can have chronic side-effects.


Jason—a secretive group of Cold War science advisers—is fighting to survive in the 21st century - Science Magazine
Jason—a secretive group of Cold War science advisers—is fighting to survive in the 21st century  Science Magazine

After 59 years of *service*, Jason, the famed science advisory group, was being fired, and it didn't know why. On 29 March, the exclusive and shadowy group of ...


Adding 1 billion hectares of forest could help check global warming - Science Magazine
Adding 1 billion hectares of forest could help check global warming  Science Magazine

Global temperatures could rise 1.5° C above preindustrial levels by as early as 2030 if current trends continue, but trees could help stem this climate crisis.


Emotion-detection applications built on outdated science, report warns: Facial movements are unreliable signals of emotion, researchers say - Science Daily
Emotion-detection applications built on outdated science, report warns: Facial movements are unreliable signals of emotion, researchers say  Science Daily

Software that purportedly reads emotions in faces is being deployed or tested for a variety of purposes, including surveillance, hiring, clinical diagnosis, and ...


Molecular structure elucidation with charge-state control - Science Magazine
Molecular structure elucidation with charge-state control  Science Magazine

High-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to control and image the charge state of organic molecules adsorbed on multilayer sodium ...


'Spooky' Quantum Entanglement Finally Captured in Stunning Photo - Live Science
'Spooky' Quantum Entanglement Finally Captured in Stunning Photo  Live Science

Scientists just captured the first-ever photo of a quantum physics phenomenon Albert Einstein once called "spooky action at a distance."


Why do 87% of data science projects never make it into production? - VentureBeat
Why do 87% of data science projects never make it into production?  VentureBeat

Why are so many companies failing to get AI strategies off the ground? AI experts from Gap, Inc. and IBM talk on stage at Transform 2019.


More than Half of USDA Science Agency Employees May Leave Rather than Relocate - GovExec.com
More than Half of USDA Science Agency Employees May Leave Rather than Relocate  GovExec.com

The union representing workers at the Economic Research *Service* and the National Institute of Food and Agriculture has requested a one-year period of fu...


Imaging Bell-type nonlocal behavior - Science Advances
Imaging Bell-type nonlocal behavior  Science Advances

The violation of a Bell inequality not only attests to the nonclassical nature of a system but also holds a very unique status within the quantum world. The amount ...


It could take 118 years for female computer scientists to match publishing rates of male colleagues - Science Magazine
It could take 118 years for female computer scientists to match publishing rates of male colleagues  Science Magazine

It could be well into the 21st century before female computer scientists annually publish as many research articles as their male counterparts, an analysis ...


A probiotic spray may help bats fight off white nose syndrome - Science News
A probiotic spray may help bats fight off white nose syndrome  Science News

Nearly half of bats infected with white nose syndrome survived through winter after being spritzed with antifungal bacteria, a small study finds.


Is 'Race Science' Making A Comeback? : Code Switch - NPR
Is 'Race Science' Making A Comeback? : Code Switch  NPR

We talked to Angela Saini, author of the new book Superior: The Return of Race Science, about how race isn't real (but you know ... still is) and how race science ...


E.P.A. Broke Rules in Shake-Up of Science Panels, Federal Watchdog Says - The New York Times
E.P.A. Broke Rules in Shake-Up of Science Panels, Federal Watchdog Says  The New York Times

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration failed to follow ethics rules last year when it dismissed academic members of Environmental Protection Agency ...


Strain-programmable fiber-based artificial muscle - Science Magazine
Strain-programmable fiber-based artificial muscle  Science Magazine

Materials that convert electrical, chemical, or thermal energy into a shape change can be used to form artificial muscles. Such materials include bimetallic strips ...


Effects of microbiota-directed foods in gnotobiotic animals and undernourished children - Science Magazine
Effects of microbiota-directed foods in gnotobiotic animals and undernourished children  Science Magazine

Childhood malnutrition is accompanied by growth stunting and immaturity of the gut microbiota. Even after therapeutic intervention with standard commercial ...


Trilayer graphene shows signs of superconductivity - Science Magazine
Trilayer graphene shows signs of superconductivity  Science Magazine

Triple sheets of carbon atoms may help solve the mystery of high-temperature superconductivity.


Artificial intelligence conquers world's most complex poker game - Science Magazine
Artificial intelligence conquers world's most complex poker game  Science Magazine

Imagine if it only took 8 days to master the most complex and challenging poker game in the world. That's all it took Pluribus, a poker-playing artificial intelligence ...


#MeTooSTEM founder out at Vanderbilt - Science Magazine
#MeTooSTEM founder out at Vanderbilt  Science Magazine

BethAnn McLaughlin, the controversial neuroscientist who founded the advocacy organization #MeTooSTEM 14 months ago, said today that she has left ...


The 'Mandela effect' and the science of false memories - The Conversation UK
The 'Mandela effect' and the science of false memories  The Conversation UK

Three classic examples of the "Mandala Effect" debunked.


Financial temptation increases civic honesty - Science Magazine
Financial temptation increases civic honesty  Science Magazine

Does temptation shape dishonesty? For example, when a person finds a wallet on the street and decides to return it to its owner, it may be because the contents ...


Starving children often don't recover, even when fed enough. Restoring their gut bacteria could help - Science Magazine
Starving children often don't recover, even when fed enough. Restoring their gut bacteria could help  Science Magazine

Even after starving children get enough to eat again, they often fail to grow. Their brains don't develop properly, and they remain susceptible to diseases, even ...


World's supply of frankincense could go up in smoke - Science Magazine
World's supply of frankincense could go up in smoke  Science Magazine

Frankincense, one of three fabled gifts the wise men brought to honor Jesus, has been used for millennia as an incense in cooking and religious ceremonies.


Sheath-run artificial muscles - Science Magazine
Sheath-run artificial muscles  Science Magazine

Materials that convert electrical, chemical, or thermal energy into a shape change can be used to form artificial muscles. Such materials include bimetallic strips ...


Courting controversy, scientists team with industry to tackle one of the world's most destructive crops - Science Magazine
Courting controversy, scientists team with industry to tackle one of the world's most destructive crops  Science Magazine

IN LIBO ON SUMATRA, INDONESIA—Crickets were chirping one clear morning in April when Anak Agung Aryawan walked under the canopy of a ...


Hungry elephants fight climate change one mouthful at a time - Science Magazine
Hungry elephants fight climate change one mouthful at a time  Science Magazine

African forest elephants can eat up to 450 kilograms of vegetation a day as they plow through the rainforests of West Africa and the Congo Basin. But all this ...


Richmond High School teacher led 52 students through Europe in the name of science - Palladium-Item
Richmond High School teacher led 52 students through Europe in the name of science  Palladium-Item

Heidi Hisrich, science teacher at Richmond High School, led 52 students through Paris and London as part of her biomedical science curriculum.


Braid: A child's awe at lunar landing leads to space science career - Calgary Herald
Braid: A child's awe at lunar landing leads to space science career  Calgary Herald

There was a kid, like millions of other kids, who watched as the first humans walked on the moon on July 20, 1969.This boy stood on the roof of his parents' ...


Generation of extreme-ultraviolet beams with time-varying orbital angular momentum - Science Magazine
Generation of extreme-ultraviolet beams with time-varying orbital angular momentum  Science Magazine

Structured light beams can serve as vortex beams carrying optical angular momentum and have been used to enhance optical communications and imaging.


A mysterious coral disease is ravaging Caribbean reefs - Science News
A mysterious coral disease is ravaging Caribbean reefs  Science News

Scientists are racing to learn what's behind a disease that's “annihilating” whole coral species in hopes of stopping it.


Scientists Find an 'Exceptional Specimen' of a Cretaceous Lizard...Inside a Dinosaur's Belly - Live Science
Scientists Find an 'Exceptional Specimen' of a Cretaceous Lizard...Inside a Dinosaur's Belly  Live Science

About 120 million years ago, a small dinosaur gulped down a lizard, swallowing the reptile whole. The wee lizard's story might have ended there, but the ...


Bill To Reinstate Obama Pesticide Ban Ignores Science - Townhall
Bill To Reinstate Obama Pesticide Ban Ignores Science  Townhall

The battle over neonicotinoid pesticides rages on. In response to one of many collusive sue-and-settle lawsuits between environmentalist groups and Obama ...


Exclusive: FDA enforcement actions plummet under Trump - Science Magazine
Exclusive: FDA enforcement actions plummet under Trump  Science Magazine

FDA actions that safeguard clinical trials, food and drug safety in steep decline, Science investigation reveals.


Antarctica breakthrough: Why 20-million-year-old intact fossil stunned geologists - Express.co.uk
Antarctica breakthrough: Why 20-million-year-old intact fossil stunned geologists  Express.co.uk

ANTARCTICA researchers uncovered a 20-million-year-old fossil below the surface, that they described as “the best” piece of history they had found to date.


'Holy Grail' of computer science found in Quantum Computing - TweakTown
'Holy Grail' of computer science found in Quantum Computing  TweakTown

Scientists have discovered that quantum interference enables processing of large sets of data faster than with standard methods.


Sleep Training Science: Myths And Facts About How To Get Baby To Sleep : Shots - Health News - NPR
Sleep Training Science: Myths And Facts About How To Get Baby To Sleep : Shots - Health News  NPR

Some parents swear by it. They say it's the only way they and their babies get any sleep. Others parents say it's harmful. So what does the science say? Here we ...


Both fish and humans have REM-like sleep - Science News
Both fish and humans have REM-like sleep  Science News

Sleeping zebrafish have brain and body activity similar to snoozing mammals, suggesting that sleep evolved at least 450 million years ago.


The great Atlantic Sargassum belt - Science Magazine
The great Atlantic Sargassum belt  Science Magazine

Floating mats of Sargassum seaweed in the center of the North Atlantic were first reported by Christopher Columbus in the 15th century. These mats, although ...


Trump officials deleting mentions of 'climate change' from U.S. Geological Survey press releases - Science Magazine
Trump officials deleting mentions of 'climate change' from U.S. Geological Survey press releases  Science Magazine

Originally published by E&E News. A March news release from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) touted a new study that could be useful for infrastructure ...


Moons that escape their planets could become 'ploonets' - Science News
Moons that escape their planets could become 'ploonets'  Science News

If giant planets in other star systems lose their moons, the freed objects could become “ploonets,” and current telescopes may be able to find them.


Releasing the brake on eating - Science Magazine
Releasing the brake on eating  Science Magazine

Obesity is a global health problem that contributes to the increased incidence of other diseases, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, autoimmune ...


A global surveillance system for crop diseases - Science Magazine
A global surveillance system for crop diseases  Science Magazine

To satisfy a growing demand for food, global agricultural production must increase by 70% by 2050. However, pests and crop diseases put global food supplies ...


Late Pleistocene exploration and settlement of the Americas by modern humans - Science Magazine
Late Pleistocene exploration and settlement of the Americas by modern humans  Science Magazine

The arrival and spread of humans across the American continent is a research topic of abiding interest. Numerous archaeological finds in recent years have led ...


RNA-guided DNA insertion with CRISPR-associated transposases - Science Magazine
RNA-guided DNA insertion with CRISPR-associated transposases  Science Magazine

Prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas systems defend bacterial cells from phage and plasmid infection. Strecker et al. characterized a CRISPR-Cas system that functions ...


Why half the scientists in some eastern European countries are women - The Economist
Why half the scientists in some eastern European countries are women  The Economist

SCIENCE IS STILL a man's world. Since 1903, when Marie Curie first won the Nobel Prize, almost 600 blokes but only 19 women have taken home the coveted ...


Struggling with your academic writing? Try these experiments to get the words flowing - Science Magazine
Struggling with your academic writing? Try these experiments to get the words flowing  Science Magazine

Our Letters to Young Scientists columnists offer some ideas for developing good writing habits.


Certify reproducibility with confidential data - Science Magazine
Certify reproducibility with confidential data  Science Magazine

Many government data, such as sensitive information on individuals' taxes, income, employment, or health, are available only to accredited users within a ...


How to Debate a Science Denier - Scientific American
How to Debate a Science Denier  Scientific American

Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the ...


NIH probe of foreign ties has led to undisclosed firings—and refunds from institutions - Science Magazine
NIH probe of foreign ties has led to undisclosed firings—and refunds from institutions  Science Magazine

An aggressive effort by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to enforce rules requiring its grantees to report foreign ties is still gathering steam. But it has already ...


Ancient cattle genomics, origins, and rapid turnover in the Fertile Crescent - Science Magazine
Ancient cattle genomics, origins, and rapid turnover in the Fertile Crescent  Science Magazine

Cattle were domesticated ∼10,000 years ago, but analysis of modern breeds has not elucidated their origins. Verdugo et al. performed genome-wide analysis of ...


Enhanced CAR–T cell activity against solid tumors by vaccine boosting through the chimeric receptor - Science Magazine
Enhanced CAR–T cell activity against solid tumors by vaccine boosting through the chimeric receptor  Science Magazine

Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)–T cell immunotherapy has been highly successful for treating certain blood cancers. Yet this approach has been a challenge ...